Tag Archives: letter

Looking Like Love: A Letter To My Parents

It’s been five months since I stepped off the plane from Asia, roundly pregnant at 28 weeks, and saw you both there waiting for me and smiling. The hills here were green, the cool air smelled of wet eucalyptus and the pancakes that we stopped for on the way home were heaped with berries, tiny crimson waterfalls falling from the stack. As I unpacked in this bedroom later that morning I thought that five months seemed like an eternity. So many milestones in life had to come and go before I would depart – Mike’s arrival after ten weeks apart, the baby’s arrival, then Mike’s departure, then Mike’s return. As I hung up my shirts, I found it impossible to fathom that I would ever leave here again. But next week, now, I will.

Just before his last departure, Mike asked me over dinner what I wanted to remember about this time. The first thing that came to mind was that I wanted to remember how special it has been to come home at 35, half a lifetime after I first left, and experience so many of the good aspects of being parented again while I was in the process of becoming a parent myself. I wanted to remember the precious mundane of this time we’ve had together as well as the epic. I wanted to remember moments like these…

I’ve been home four days and I’m still nervous about driving on this side of the road again. Mum takes me to my first appointment with the obstetrician, then shopping. I try to protest that I don’t need any clothes, that the ones I salvaged from the communal stockpile of maternity clothes that get passed around among expatriates in Laos will be just fine for the next three months before the baby comes. I am overruled. As Mum is marching me into changing rooms she says I will thank her later. I am far less ruffled by this particular maternal prophecy now than I was at 14, and when I wear that grey tracksuit jacket every day for two weeks straight, when I am fifteen pounds heavier and needing clothes suitable for leaving the house, I do.

I am 31 weeks pregnant and Dad suggests a walk. I don’t really want to drag my baby bulk off the couch or circumnavigate my belly to get sneakers on, but Dad reminds me that I’ll feel better if I make the effort. Now we’re outside in that magical hour of almost evening. The golden light is skimming over the grassy fields, filtering through the gum trees, dancing on the dirt road ahead of us. We talk of work and family, and frustrations and joys – occasionally breaking new ground in this familiar conversational territory. Halfway up a hill we spy wallabies feeding in the glade below. I watch them bound away, envying their speed and grace, not to mention their birthing process.

I am 35 weeks pregnant and Dad is working in South Sudan for a month. Mum’s presence in the house prevents the quiet from feeling empty, and I am amazed at how busy life still feels even now. I am wrapping up consulting work. I am talking to Mike on skype. I am driving to doctor appointments. I am napping. I am melting dark chocolate to make elaborate biscuits with malted coconut icing. Mum says she is glad I’m around, even if I make an astounding mess in the kitchen each time I bake and by the way how do I generate that much washing up? I point out that I clean up after myself (in this area, anyway). We smile. We spend easy evenings watching crime dramas and reruns of Friends. It is the middle of winter but life has the peaceful feel of a still lake on a summer day.

I am 38 weeks pregnant and it’s the night before Mike’s arrival. The thick blue and grey wrap that I commandeered from Mum’s closet two days after I arrived keeps the cold at bay as Dad and I eat Thai food under the stars. After dinner we walk next door, into one of the happiest places on earth, and Dad spends too much money on gourmet ice cream to take home because he knows it will make me smile. Later that night I wake up at 3am to pee for the third time that night, come downstairs in the dark, and help myself to seconds. As a teenager I would have covered my tracks. Now, I leave the bowl in the sink.    

It’s 5am. I’m two days overdue and finally in labour. You’ve heard Mike stirring and come out to find out if all is well and kiss me goodbye. Already in the car, half gone on this journey into pain, I say I don’t want to be kissed, I don’t want to be touched. I know you won’t mind. Later that evening, after my life has changed forever, I will ask over the phone if you could please stop and pick up a pizza on the way to the hospital. When you arrive Dad also presents sorbet, Mum gives me prunes. “Now is not the time to get constipated,” Mum says knowingly. The idea is inconceivable – I am propped up in bed, sitting awkwardly on an hour’s worth of stitching and with the miraculous trauma of the day on replay in my mind. I tell you not to worry, that I have decided to deal with that issue by just never pooing again. No one argues with me. You beam and say that you’re so proud and that Dominic is beautiful. I look at that little bundle in your arms and wonder how on earth he happened.

These are those first days home from the hospital – a bewildering blur of baby, broken sleep, and breastfeeding woes. Dad is helping Mike dig a hole so that we can plant a tree to commemorate Dominic’s birth. Mum is making lunch, and dinner, and lunch, and dinner. Dad is building a fire to keep the living room warm and we eat in there – watching the flames fashion coals, watching Dominic asleep on a blanket on the floor. Mum witnesses our first fumbling attempts to burp our child, to bath him. She thinks we aren’t dressing him warmly enough. Demonstrating unusual delicacy she bites her tongue, wondering how much advice she should venture to dish out, but I discover an advantage to having a child so many years safely distant from my own childhood. Advice is generally welcomed rather than merely tolerated, or ignored.

Dominic is five weeks old. Mike has left again, bequeathing me the baby and a score of love notes hidden in such unlikely places that I will still be finding them three weeks after his departure. Slowly, slowly, I start to find my feet in this mothering role. I venture to think that just maybe I’ll be able to join good friends for five days at a reunion. I don’t know how many times I’ve circumnavigated the world alone now, so I am amused and mildly exasperated when Mum reminds me to start packing no fewer than four times in the days leaving up to departure. It gives me the warm fuzzies, though, on the morning that we do leave to hear her telling Dominic how she’ll miss him and to find that Dad has gathered me a pile of useful miscellaneous to take – the phone charger, sunscreen, a hiking headlamp in case I need to get up in the dark and can’t find a light, two bottles of wine to share. The car is full of petrol. “It shouldn’t need to be refilled,” Dad says, “but if it does, don’t forget that it’s diesel.”

It’s 5am and Dominic is seven weeks old. I’m getting up, fumbling for the dimmed lights, stooping to pick him up for the third time tonight. I’m too tired to sit to feed so I take him to bed and lie there beside him, satisfying his demanding little mouth with my body. He kneads my breasts with small fists and makes little mewling sighs of relief as he eats. I feel like echoing them. For I know that Mum will probably turn the handle to my bedroom sometime between 5:30 and 6am, as she’s done most mornings for the past month, carry him away, and leave me a cup of tea and the chance of some more much-needed sleep in his place.

I came alone almost five months ago, and a week from today I will leave as part of a family of three. I return to all the adventures and frustrations of Laos with new responsibilities. I return determined to think through qualities like love, joy, and peace during the year ahead. I return hopeful that I will, increasingly, embody these qualities. It is perhaps harder to define what love means than to describe what it looks like, but as I work to understand and live out love in this new family that Mike and I are creating I remain unfailingly grateful for my first family and the example that you set as parents – then and now. Thank you for, so much of the time, looking like love.

Lisa

This post is part of a series on the fruits of the spirit. The current theme is love. Where have you seen love this week? What did it look like?

Advertisements

Lisa and Mike 2008 (The Short Version)

January: Lisa and Mike meet for the first time in Brisbane airport. They spend two weeks in Ballina trying to figure out whether building a relationship from the ground up over seven thousand miles is completely mad.

February: Mike calls Lisa his girlfriend for the first time in a mass email. Lisa reads it and figures they’re officially dating. Lisa returns to LA and Mike to PNG. Mike calls Lisa on the phone for the first time. Lisa doesn’t recognize his voice, then refuses to believe it’s him, then the phone goes dead. Welcome to long distance dating.

March: Mike and Lisa discover Skype-dating. Lisa settles into a new apartment in LA and Mike moves into a new cottage in PNG (since most of his stuff was stolen by raskols earlier in the year, this doesn’t take him long). Lisa travels to DC for work and meets Mike’s parents for the first time, without Mike.

April: Lisa and Mike discover Skype dating doesn’t work so well when Mike spends weeks in the bush. While in the bush Mike spends the time thinking proposal and wondering how he’s going to get a ring in PNG. In LA, Lisa is clueless, and working on her next novel on child trafficking.

May: Mike gives Lisa the shock of her life by proposing on May 10, a week after arriving in LA for a month. Lisa says “yes”. Then she says “time out.” Then she says “yes” again on May 13.

June: Back in PNG Mike spends Saturday mornings scuba diving, Saturday afternoons on Skype dates, and Saturday nights showering under a downspout during thunderstorms. Mike thinks he’s died and gone to aid worker heaven. Lisa gets a taste of the American bush during a weekend in Kansas (complete with air conditioning, showers, and cable tv) and continues to work on her second novel.

July: Skype dates. Lisa goes to Florida for the Christy Awards. She doesn’t win. Mike spends his last weeks out bush in Vanuatu and Bougainville. Mike gets giardia again while stuck in Bougainville due to an airline strike. Lisa continues work on her second novel.

August: Skype dates. Mike says goodbye to PNG by spending as much time as possible underwater and then biking 200 km in 2.5 days. Lisa puts her 2nd novel temporarily on hold because it’s too depressing, and starts her 3rd novel instead.

September: Mike arrives in LA and has a meltdown in the supermarket juice aisle on day 2. Mike and Lisa spend time on picnic blankets eating strawberries and drinking wine. Lisa appears on the cover of Christian Singles Magazine and is soundly mocked by all her friends and her fiancée. Lisa puts her 3rd novel on hold and starts her 4th.

October: Three weeks after Mike lands in LA, Lisa heads off for 2 weeks to Kenya and Tanzania to run regional training. In LA Mike attempts to write stories about his time on the field but ends up stuck. In Tanzania, Lisa ditches her 4th novel and decides to write a memoir.

November: Lisa heads to Washington DC to host conferences while Mike takes over as chief LA-based wedding planner. Chief Australia-based wedding planner (Lisa’s Mum) is pleased with this development, as Mike is as efficient as she is. Mike takes Lisa on a hike. Lisa discovers that Mike’s notion of “fun hike” is very different than hers. Mike and Lisa talk about hiking with their pre-marital counselor.

December: Mike buys Lisa her first ever Christmas tree of her own, then realizes he’s never had one of his own. Lisa decides she’ll share with him, just this once. Lisa and Mike count down the days to the wedding.

We’re excited about 2009, and hope you are, too.

Love, Lisa and Mike